Image of Dr. Jason Trent

Contact Information

Academic School

School of Social and Behavioral Sciences

Office

Dyson 341

Email

Jason.Trent@marist.edu

Phone

845-575-3000 ext. 2188

Dr. Jason Trent

Assistant Professor of Psychology

Bio

Dr. Trent received his PhD in Social/Personality Psychology. His most recent research has focused on first impressions, specifically the characteristics of the raters and targets that contribute to these kinds of judgments. Dr. Trent has also been involved in research relating to meaning in life, positive affect, and how trusting your intuition can influence how you view your world. He particularly enjoys working with students on research projects they are passionate about. Dr. Trent's most recent interests include how different aspects of modern society (e.g., smartphones, social media, consumerism, etc.) influence human behavior.

Education

PhD, Philosophy in Social/Personality Psychology, University of Missouri, Columbia,
Columbia, MO, 2013
MA, Psychology, University of Missouri, Columbia, Columbia, MO, 2010
BA, Business Studies, Richard Stockton College of New Jersey, Pomona, NJ, 2005

Research Interests / Areas of Focus

Dr. Trent's most recent research has focused on first impressions, specifically the characteristics of the raters and targets that contribute to these kinds of judgments. He has also been involved in research relating to meaning in life, positive affect, and how trusting your intuition can influence how you view your world. Dr. Trent's most recent interests include how different aspects of modern society (e.g., smartphones, social media, consumerism, etc.) influence human behavior.

Selected Publications

*= Student collaboration

Heintzelman, S. J., Trent, J., & King, L. A. (2016). How would the self be remembered? Evidence for posthumous self-verification. Journal of Research in Personality, 61, 1-10

Heintzelman, S.J., Trent, J., & King, L.A. (2014). Revisiting Desirable Response Bias in Well- being Reports. The Journal of Positive Psychology, 10, 167-178

Heintzelman, S.J., Trent, J., & King, L.A. (2013). Encounters with Objective Coherence and the Experience of Meaning in Life. Psychological Science, 24(6), 991-998

Trent, J., Lavelock, C.*, & King, L. A. (2013). Processing fluency, positive affect, and judgments of meaning in life. The Journal of Positive Psychology, 8(2), 135-139

Trent, J. & King, L. A. (2013). Faith in Intuition moderates the relationship between positive affect and gender stereotyping. Personality and Individual Differences, 54, 865-868

Heintzelman, S.J., Christopher, J., Trent, J., & King, L.A. (2013). Counterfactual thinking about one's birth enhances well-being judgments. The Journal of Positive Psychology, 8, 44-49.

King, L. A, & Trent, J. (2012). Personality Strengths?. In I. B. Weiner (Ed.), Handbook of Psychology: Vol. 5 Personality and Social Psychology (2nd ed.). New York: Wiley

Hicks, J. A., Trent, J., Davis, W., & King, L. A. (2011). Positive affect, meaning in life, and future time perspective: An application of socioemotional selectivity theory. Psychology and Aging, 27, 181-189

Trent, J. & King, L. A. (2010). Predictors of rapid vs. thoughtful judgments of meaning in life. The Journal of Positive Psychology, 5(6), 439-451

Hicks, J. A., Cicero, D.C., Trent, J., Burton, C. B., & King, L. A. (2010). Positive affect, intuition, and feelings of meaning. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 98(6), 967- 979

King, L. A, & Trent, J. (2009). What and where is behavior in personality psychology? European Journal of Personality, 23(5), 403-435


Selected Presentations

Trent, J. & Onomake, B.* (2019). The Interaction of Rater Ethnicity, Target Ethnicity, and Target Facial Expression in Predicting Trait Ratings. Poster to be presented at the 19th Annual Meeting of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Portland, OR

Cannon, M.* & Trent, J. (2018). Attitudes Towards Gluten and Gluten-Free Individuals. Poster to be presented at the 59th New England Psychological Association Meeting, Worcester, MA

Trent, J. & Hilgard, J. (2018). How Facial Morphology Relates to Judgements of Trust and Criminality. Poster presented at the 19th Annual Meeting of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Atlanta, GA

Trainque, R.* & Trent, J. (2018). Trust Judgments of Female Criminal and Non-Criminal Photos. Poster presented at the 89th Annual Meeting of the Eastern Psychological Association, Philadelphia, PA

Trent, J. & Onomake, B.* (2017). How Ethnicity and Facial Expression Influence First Impressions. Poster presented at the 18 th Annual Meeting of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, San Antonio, TX

Onomake, B.* & Trent, J. (2017). The influence of ethnicity and facial expression on evaluations of student profiles. Poster presented at the 88 th Annual Meeting of the Eastern Psychological Association, Boston, MA

Wilson, N.* & Trent, J. (2016). Men versus Women: A comparison of perceived states, traits, and criminality. Poster presented at the 87 th Annual Meeting of the Eastern Psychological Association, New York, NY

Trent, J. & Wilson, N.* (2016). Smile! How facial expressions influence perceived traits. Poster presented at the 17th Annual Meeting of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, San Diego, CA

Trent, J. & Wilson, N.* (2015). Which Perceived Traits and Emotions Contribute to Perceived Trustworthiness? An Analysis Using Independent Samples. Poster presented at the 16th Annual Meeting of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Long Beach, CA

Trent, J. (2015). Journal Article Group Work Made Easy. Talk given at the Society for the Teaching of Psychology Pre-Conference for the Annual Meeting of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Long Beach, CA

Wiseman, R.*, & Trent, J. (2015). Constructing a Meaningful Life-Review. Talk given at the Association for Death Education and Counseling 37th Annual Conference, San Antonio, TX

Wilson, N.* & Trent, J. (2015). What Contributes To Perceived Criminality? The Influence of Traits, States, and Trustworthiness. Poster presented at the 86 th Annual Meeting of the Eastern Psychological Association, Philadelphia, PA